Low-tech coach restoration (3)

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A couple of the coaches I’m restoring had buckled or sagging rooves, so I’ve making new ones from Plastikard. This particular tube is 3.1 cm across, and is in fact a bit of plumbing from a sink.



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The tube immersed in a tub of boiling hot water, left for 10 minutes and then cooled down quickly under the tap.



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The resulting curve works out right for the single-arc roof profile on these coaches. The Plastikard is 0.5 mm which I think is the thinnest I can get away with while still keeping it relatively sturdy.



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Gas piping from Alan Gibson straight brass wire (should it have been a smidgen thinner?) and lamp tops from IKB. The rainstrips are plastic strips from Evergreen.



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I’ve been ambivalent about grab rails on coach ends (life is hard for the railway modeller!). Partly because it can sometimes look too obtrusive on models: If you look at a real coach, it is not really something that captures the eye. And partly because I like to have my rooves removable, and the rails gets in the way of that. So some of my coaches only have the grab rails indicated. But now I’ve decided I want it there in full, so the rooves will just have to be fixed in place.



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A trial fit and things look OK. But it seems I’ve gone and squashed the lamp brackets – hope I can get them straightened out!



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Glueing down the roof on a V2 that I finished some time ago. I kept the original roof on this one. The coach is on a flat surface with bits and pieces stuck in below to get just the right tension on the elastic bands - enough to keep it tight but not so much as to bend/damage the roof.

I realize that plastic rooves are not as good as brass ones, and they require good internal support. But so far I haven't had problems with other rooves I've done in the past, so it seems to work. 

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